Tuition is a Drag. Apply for an IAM Scholarship.

The 2017 IAM Scholarship Competition is now accepting applications. The deadline for submissions is February 24, 2017.

Click here to download applications and see eligibility rules.

The IAM awards scholarships to:

      • Children of IAM members (parent or guardian) applying for college
      • Children of IAM members (parent or guardian) applying for vocational or technical School
      • IAM members applying for college

Since its implementation in 1960, the Scholarship Competition has continued to grow. This past year, 2015-2016, the IAM received 294 applications for scholarships. The 16 scholarships awarded were valued at $72,000.

By Convention Resolution, IAM delegates determined that voluntary contributions to finance the Scholarship fund be set at 50 cents per member, per year. To date, 224 of the IAM’s approximately 960 Locals have contributed. If your lodge has not adopted this resolution or has not contributed for this year, please give it serious consideration at your next lodge meeting.

You may call the IAM Safety and Health Department, which administers the scholarship competition, at 301-967-4708 to request an application packet to be mailed. Application packets have been sent to the local and district lodges.

Click here for details on the 2017 IAM Scholarship competition.

International President Bob Martinez’s Labor Day Message

A Labor Day Message from International President Bob Martinez

09_04_2016_MartinezAs always when we celebrate Labor Day, we have an important responsibility to honor the struggles and sacrifices of those sisters and brothers who secured the rights we enjoy today.

IAM members understand that child labor laws, safe work environments, health care and the eight-hour workday did not come from the benevolence of employers or government. These and many other worker protections are the result of many long hard fights. We must continue the fight to protect the rights those who preceded us secured for our benefit and the benefit of future generations. We have an obligation to pay it forward.

Right now, when we look at the actions of many corporations and right-wing politicians, it is obvious the fight for workers’ rights and human rights is far from over. Right-to-work (for less) laws are either on the books or proposed across the continent. Multi-national corporations are using their financial clout to push thinly veiled anti-worker trade deals, like the Trans-Pacific Partnership, down our throats.

But the good news is that we are using our power and working with allies in government and working people everywhere to defeat them. We are mobilizing and engaging younger workers and community groups to join with organized labor to protect and expand the rights our predecessors struggle and sacrificed secured for us. When we are unified and ready to fight, we are capable of great things.

The 39th IAM Grand Lodge Convention is in full swing this Labor Day – there is no better or fitting time for us to gather together and confront the challenges we face. The delegates will be using their voices to send a clear and unequivocal message to those corporations and right –wing politicians who seek to roll back the clock on the middle class – “Not now, not on our watch.” The delegates will also bring a positive message about the future of the IAM to their local lodges, families and communities.

From my family to yours, please have a safe and enjoyable Labor Day weekend.

In solidarity,

Bob Martinez
International President

Happy Labor Day

labor stamp Happy Labor Day From Local 24!

For those interested in the history of this holiday celebrating Labor’s contribution to making the American dream a reality check out:   A Machinist Founded Labor Day

Remember Thank a Machinist for your day off!

And from the US Department of Labor’s website: Department Of Labor

DOL’s Historian on the History of Labor Day

Linda Stinson, a former U.S. Department of Labor’s historian, provided us with some answers about the history of Labor Day in 2011.

Q: What’s the history of Labor Day? How did it all begin?

A: The Labor Day holiday is interesting because it evolved over a period of years. In 19th century America, there was already a tradition of having parades, picnics and various other celebrations in support of labor issues, such as shorter hours or to rally strikers. But most historians emphasize one specific event in the development of today’s modern Labor Day. That pivotal event was the parade of unions and a massive picnic that took place in New York City on Sept. 5, 1882.

At that time, the labor movement was growing stronger. Many of the unions in New York prospered by joining together into one Central Labor Union made up of members from many local unions. On May 14, 1882, a proposal was made at the Central Labor Union meeting that all workers should join together for a “monster labor festival” in early September. A committee of five people was appointed to find a park for the celebration. They chose Wendel’s Elm Park at 92nd Street and 9th Avenue, the largest park in New York City at that time; the date was set for Tuesday, September 5. By June, they had sold 20,000 tickets with the proceeds going to each local union selling them. In August, the Central Labor Union passed a resolution “that the 5th of September be proclaimed a general holiday for the workingmen in this city.”

At first they were afraid that the celebration was going to be a failure. Many of the workers in the parade had to lose a day’s pay in order to participate. When the parade began only a handful of workers were in it, while hundreds of people stood on the sidewalk jeering at them. But then slowly they came – 200 workers and a band from the Jewelers’ Union showed up and joined the parade. Then came a group of bricklayers with another band. By the time they reached the park, it was estimated that there were 10,000 marchers in the parade in support of workers.

The park was decorated with flags of many nations. Everyone picnicked, drank beer and listened to speeches from the union leadership. In the evening, even more people came to the park to watch fireworks and dance. The newspapers of the day declared it a huge success and “a day of the people.”

After that major event in New York City, other localities began to pick up the idea for a fall festival of parades and picnics celebrating workers.

Q: Can you clear up some confusion: who is the father of Labor Day?

A: When studying the history of Labor Day, two names stand out, and the funny thing is that they sound just alike. One is Peter J. McGuire, a leading official in the American Federation of Labor and organizer of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners. The other is Matthew Maguire, a machinist from the Knights of Labor. The problem with declaring a single “founder” of Labor Day is that, at the time, no one realized that a new national holiday was being born. It was only after the fact that people tried to pinpoint a single founding father.

Seven years after that first New York Labor Day parade, the union journal for the United Brotherhood of Carpenters published an article claiming that their union brother, McGuire, made the original proposal to have the Labor Day event in New York and called for one day a year to be set aside as Labor Day. This article was reprinted yearly, and it became the common assumption that these were the facts.

However, in 1967, a retired machinist from Maguire’s union stepped up and claimed that his union brother was, in fact, the true originator of the movement for a national Labor Day. He pointed to an old newspaper article written nine years after the New York Labor Day parade titled “Labor Day: Its History and Development in the Land.” This article claimed that the first Secretary of the Central Labor Union, Maguire, was the one who arranged the parade. This claim was supported six years later when the grand marshal of the New York parade of 1882 himself reminisced about how Maguire from the Knights of Labor had first suggested that the Central Labor Union call upon the unions of New York City to join together in a labor parade.

So the historical conundrum seems to hinge on the fact that the two names sound alike and were probably mixed up in the common consciousness. Toss in the years of bitter rivalry between the American Federation of Labor and the Knights of Labor and, of course, you’re going to have multiple heroes emerging in the legend of Labor Day.

I don’t really know if there is only one true parent of Labor Day. But when former Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz spoke at the convention of the International Association of Machinists in 1968, he said: “My decision…is that there is no question as to who is the father of Labor Day in this country. Officially, as of this moment, insofar as the Department of Labor is concerned, it is Matt Maguire, machinist!” So in the question of McGuire versus Maguire, I don’t really know. But my money backs Bill Wirtz every time!

Q: When did it become a national holiday and why?

A: Labor Day as a national, legal holiday had an interesting evolution. The legalized celebration of Labor Day began as individual state celebrations. In 1887, New York, New Jersey and Colorado were among the first states to approve state legal holidays. Then other states joined in to create their own state Labor Days. Finally, in response to a groundswell of support for a national holiday celebrating the nation’s workers, Sen. James Henderson Kyle of South Dakota introduced S. 730 to the 53rd Congress to make Labor Day a legal holiday on the first Monday of September each year. It was approved on June 28, 1894.



DynCorp ASD CBA Ratification Vote Results

Brothers and Sisters of Local Lodge 24,

We had our ratification vote yesterday, August 15, 2016, in hangar 3 at Joint Base Andrews.

First, let me thank everyone who came out and voted.  We had a sixty five percent (65%) turnout.  Again,  Thank You.

The contract was ratified by a vote of 163 for 47 against.  Seventy-eight percent (78%) ratification approval.

Second, I would like to thank the negotiating team for their effort in getting the best contract for its members.  There were a lot of long hours in preparation and across the table with the company.     Thank you.

Third and last thanks go to Directing Business Rep Joseph (Rick) Compher.  He was there guiding us at the tables and the ratification.

Thank you everyone who had a part in making this negotiation and ratification a success.


Gregg French                     Jason Gast                           Sarah Geddes
President                            Vice President                    Secretary Treasurer
LL 24                                    LL 24                                     LL 24


Tim Hanson                        Al Nuzzo
Chief Steward                    Recording Secretary
LL 24                                    LL 24

2016 DynCorp ASD Tenative Agreement


Click here for a copy of the CBA Tentative Agreement

Brothers and Sisters

Contract negotiations between the IAM and DynCorp have concluded.
The Union and Company have reached a tentative agreement pending your ratification. A ratification vote will be held this Monday, August 15, 2016 from 5:00 am through 7:00 pm. The vote will take place in Hangar 3.
We look forward to seeing you at the ratification.

Al Nuzzo
IAM&AW Local 24; Recording Secretary




QA has been added to the Maintenance CBA in this tentative agreement.
  1. Cover Page: Contract is from September 1, 2016 through August 31, 2020
  2. Article 2: We have the addition of one more Union Steward and language changes.
  3. Article 3: We redefined and improved the Grievance language and procedures.
  4. Article 5: Added language for the availability of light duty while rehabbing an on the job injury
  5. Article 5: Added language to have expired disciplinary paperwork removed from employees personal records here at Joint Base Andrews.
  6. Article 6:  Reduced the time for advanced notice for taking hourly leave.
  7. Article 6: Up to 7 days of vested vacation can be used for call out leave.
  8. Article 6: Improved language for Bereavement Leave
  9. Article 6: Added language for the possibility of receiving any additional declared Federal Holidays.
  10. Article 7: Increased the boot allowance and added language to allow an employee to purchase multiple pairs of boots and or rain gear in each contract year as long as the maximum amount is not exceeded.
  11. Article 10: Added a Substance Abuse guide as stated in Appendix F.
  12. Appendix A: Base Pay increases of 3% (2016) – 2.75% (2017) – 2.75% (2018) and 3% (2019) effective September 1 of each year stated. Also increased the shift differential pay for second and third shift.
  13. Appendix B: introduction of Group Insurance Plan with an HSA.  Negotiated to have the company freeze the Dental and Vision premiums for the length of the contract. Also negotiated a forty percent (40%) increase in the Company contributions to the IAM Pension Fund.
  14. Appendix D: revised and improved the Inclement Weather Policy and added it to the CBA.
  15. Appendix F: Added the Substance Abuse Guidelines for a Drug Free Workforce.
  16. Appendix G: Added a Disciplinary Guide into the CBA.

DynCorp ASD Contract Tentative Agreement and Vote.

Brothers and Sisters

Contract negotiations between the IAM and DynCorp have concluded.
The Union and Company have reached a tentative agreement pending your ratification. A ratification vote will be held this Monday, August 15, 2016 from 5:00 am through 7:00 pm. The vote will take place in Hangar 3.
We look forward to seeing you at the ratification.

Al Nuzzo
IAM&AW Local 24; Recording Secretary