DynCorp ASD CBA Ratification Vote Results

Brothers and Sisters of Local Lodge 24,

We had our ratification vote yesterday, August 15, 2016, in hangar 3 at Joint Base Andrews.

First, let me thank everyone who came out and voted.  We had a sixty five percent (65%) turnout.  Again,  Thank You.

The contract was ratified by a vote of 163 for 47 against.  Seventy-eight percent (78%) ratification approval.

Second, I would like to thank the negotiating team for their effort in getting the best contract for its members.  There were a lot of long hours in preparation and across the table with the company.     Thank you.

Third and last thanks go to Directing Business Rep Joseph (Rick) Compher.  He was there guiding us at the tables and the ratification.

Thank you everyone who had a part in making this negotiation and ratification a success.

 

Gregg French                     Jason Gast                           Sarah Geddes
President                            Vice President                    Secretary Treasurer
LL 24                                    LL 24                                     LL 24

 

Tim Hanson                        Al Nuzzo
Chief Steward                    Recording Secretary
LL 24                                    LL 24

2016 DynCorp ASD Tenative Agreement

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Click here for a copy of the CBA Tentative Agreement

Brothers and Sisters

Contract negotiations between the IAM and DynCorp have concluded.
The Union and Company have reached a tentative agreement pending your ratification. A ratification vote will be held this Monday, August 15, 2016 from 5:00 am through 7:00 pm. The vote will take place in Hangar 3.
We look forward to seeing you at the ratification.

Al Nuzzo
IAM&AW Local 24; Recording Secretary

 

HIGHLIGHT SHEET FOR THE 2016 DynCorp ASD TENTATIVE CBA AGREEMENT

HIGHLIGHT SHEET FOR THE 2016 TENTATIVE CBA AGREEMENT

QA has been added to the Maintenance CBA in this tentative agreement.
  1. Cover Page: Contract is from September 1, 2016 through August 31, 2020
  2. Article 2: We have the addition of one more Union Steward and language changes.
  3. Article 3: We redefined and improved the Grievance language and procedures.
  4. Article 5: Added language for the availability of light duty while rehabbing an on the job injury
  5. Article 5: Added language to have expired disciplinary paperwork removed from employees personal records here at Joint Base Andrews.
  6. Article 6:  Reduced the time for advanced notice for taking hourly leave.
  7. Article 6: Up to 7 days of vested vacation can be used for call out leave.
  8. Article 6: Improved language for Bereavement Leave
  9. Article 6: Added language for the possibility of receiving any additional declared Federal Holidays.
  10. Article 7: Increased the boot allowance and added language to allow an employee to purchase multiple pairs of boots and or rain gear in each contract year as long as the maximum amount is not exceeded.
  11. Article 10: Added a Substance Abuse guide as stated in Appendix F.
  12. Appendix A: Base Pay increases of 3% (2016) – 2.75% (2017) – 2.75% (2018) and 3% (2019) effective September 1 of each year stated. Also increased the shift differential pay for second and third shift.
  13. Appendix B: introduction of Group Insurance Plan with an HSA.  Negotiated to have the company freeze the Dental and Vision premiums for the length of the contract. Also negotiated a forty percent (40%) increase in the Company contributions to the IAM Pension Fund.
  14. Appendix D: revised and improved the Inclement Weather Policy and added it to the CBA.
  15. Appendix F: Added the Substance Abuse Guidelines for a Drug Free Workforce.
  16. Appendix G: Added a Disciplinary Guide into the CBA.

DynCorp ASD Contract Tentative Agreement and Vote.

Brothers and Sisters

Contract negotiations between the IAM and DynCorp have concluded.
The Union and Company have reached a tentative agreement pending your ratification. A ratification vote will be held this Monday, August 15, 2016 from 5:00 am through 7:00 pm. The vote will take place in Hangar 3.
We look forward to seeing you at the ratification.

Al Nuzzo
IAM&AW Local 24; Recording Secretary

Happy Memorial Day

A Memorial Day Message from the Machinists Union

Sisters and Brothers,

As we celebrate Memorial Day this year, we must not to forget the men and women of our armed forces who gave their lives defending our nation and our way of life.

As patriotic Americans, the IAM family has strong respect for our nation’s lost heroes. Although some may take for granted the freedoms we all enjoy, they came at great cost and sacrifice. Many of our members actively serve or are military veterans. Tens of thousands of Machinists work to support our armed forces at bases, arsenals and factories across the country.

Please enjoy this holiday weekend and I hope you will display our nation’s flag with pride, in honor of those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

In solidarity,

Bob Martinez

International President

Memorial Day is a day to honor those who died in service to their country. One of the ways we do this is by flying the Flag of the United States. If you would like to learn about the history of the Flag and proper etiquette while displaying it check here: Our Flag

LEST WE FORGET THE REAL MEANING OF THE DAY…

The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France is located in Colleville-sur-Mer, on the site of the temporary American St. Laurent Cemetery, established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944 as the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site, at the north end of its half mile access road, covers 172.5 acres and contains the graves of 9,387 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. On the Walls of the Missing, in a semicircular garden on the east side of the memorial, are inscribed 1,557 names. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France is located in Colleville-sur-Mer, on the site of the temporary American St. Laurent Cemetery, established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944 as the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site covers 172.5 acres and contains the graves of 9,387 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. On the Walls of the Missing, in a semicircular garden on the east side of the memorial, are inscribed 1,557 names.

“It is, in a way, an odd thing to honor those who died in defense of our country, in defense of us, in wars far away. The imagination plays a trick. We see these soldiers in our mind as old and wise. We see them as something like the Founding Fathers, grave and gray haired. But most of them were boys when they died, and they gave up two lives — the one they were living and the one they would have lived. When they died, they gave up their chance to be husbands and fathers and grandfathers. They gave up their chance to be revered old men. They gave up everything for our country, for us. And all we can do is remember.”

President Ronald Reagan

Happy Birthday IAM. Looking Good at 128.

. IAM members attending classes at the Winpisinger Center today were treated to a cake commemorating the 128th anniversary of the founding of the Machinists Union.

IAM members attending classes at the Winpisinger Center today were treated to a cake commemorating the 128th anniversary of the founding of the Machinists Union.

IAM International President Bob Martinez issued the following statement commemorating the 128th anniversary of the IAM’s founding: “May 5 marks the 128th anniversary since 19 Machinists met in secret to create the organization known today around the world as the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers. “It’s an occasion to celebrate the ability of this union to endure and survive every manner of economic and political hardship, from world wars and global depressions to political attacks aimed at terminating our very existence. This achievement required tenacity and sacrifice from literally millions of men and women who believed that our union and its members were worth fighting for. “This day is also an occasion to rededicate ourselves to the cause of justice in the workplace that remains under constant attack today. Despite great technological advances that have transformed workplaces across North America, we still face a corporate agenda that values profits over people and constantly seeks to suppress workers’ voices. “I ask each and every member of this great union to pause today, be proud and consider our responsibility as beneficiaries of 128 years of victories, struggles, setbacks and ultimately survival. I am totally confident we are worthy of our legacy and equal to the challenges ahead.

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For more than 120 years, the IAM has fought for workers’ rights and the benefits so often taken for granted. Benefits like sick pay, leaves of absence, bereavement leave, holidays, vacations, retirement security and healthcare.

By forming a union, workers provide themselves with the opportunity to secure a voice in their workplace and ensure justice on the job. Union members are able to sit down with management as equals and bargain for better workplace conditions. For some, that might be higher wages and better benefits. For others it might be job security or fair treatment.

Our Union started 128 years ago in a locomotive pit in Atlanta, Georgia.

locomotive

Thomas Talbot first president of the IAM

Thomas Talbot first president of the IAM

On May 5, 1888 19 railroad machinists met in a locomotive pit in Atlanta, Georgia to form a trade union that would become the International Association of Machinists. They appoint Thomas Talbott as their leader. At the time railroad machinists earned 20 to 25 cents an hour and worked a ten-hour day.

Most of the Machinists Union’s early organizing was done by men known as boomers. These journeymen were known as boomers because they followed the railroads to towns that were booming.  The boomers were part hobo, part skilled craftsmen.

Often boomers had to communicate by a system of secret passwords or signals known only to other machinists. Union organizers not only risked firing and blacklisting but beatings and jail. The old-time boomers accepted these risks.  The boomers established local lodges in areas where they were not already present. Within one year there were 40 lodges, and by 1891, there were 189.

Today the IAM is a large and diverse organization, representing 720,000 members across North America. The IAM is one of the largest and most experienced unions in North America. You will find Machinists in aerospace, transportation, the federal government, automotive, defense, woodworking and several other industries. We represent workers at companies as diverse as Harley-Davidson, Southwest Airlines, Boeing, Pratt & Whitney, Freightliner, Tennessee Valley Authority and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.